Manifesto: copyright law

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ravanwin
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Manifesto: copyright law

Post by ravanwin » Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:59 pm

Anyone out there have an answer to this:

what is the legal status of a Manifesto and under what circumstance could they be reproduced. Is a manifesto protected under regular copyright law?

Who owns the unabomber manifesto? the futurist manifesto? dadaist manifesto?

I can't seem to track anything down online but my gut is telling me that manifesto's copyright lies with the author and, from there, regular "life + 30 years (or whatever) " applies to terms of the copyright?

Any one out there know? maybe someone can contact the NLS and ask?

ryan

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martinmckenna
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Post by martinmckenna » Wed Sep 12, 2007 2:00 pm

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti (1876-1944)the author of the futureist one has already got one work at project gutenberg , so i would guess the manifesto is public domain too , but this may only apply to the orginal version rather then the translation of it .

there is version of it here ,

http://www.cscs.umich.edu/~crshalizi/T4 ... festo.html

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Martin
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Post by Martin » Wed Sep 12, 2007 5:45 pm

I don't see any reason calling something a "manifesto" would affect its status under copyright law.

However, since (I would have thought) manifestos are generally things that the authors want to see as widely distributed as possible, there might exist statements in or accompanying them which permit free reproduction.

Newington Bandit
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Post by Newington Bandit » Fri Sep 14, 2007 5:18 pm

I had a wee look, manifestos fall under the same copyright law as other material (it's life +70 years, not 30 years). However, it is possible to use material, either by buying the copyright, or getting a license. Licenses do not (and usually are not) have to be in writing form, they can be just implied, like when an author sends an article to a magazine, for instance.
If a manifesto is published on the web, there is often a copyright note, explaining the conditions of using the text...

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ravanwin
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Post by ravanwin » Mon Sep 17, 2007 11:20 am

nice one bandit! thanks to you and the NLS.

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