What was the last book you read?

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Gandhi
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Postby Gandhi » Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:59 pm

hemulen's talking in tongues!
It's like God's vagina!

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beev
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Postby beev » Tue Dec 04, 2007 11:02 am

This thread started with Dave Eggars, and I just finished his latest: What is the What

I don't know who put this in my pigeon hole. Obviously someone who knows me, or else a mental coincidence since I'm fascinated by the craziness of war in Sudan. Anyway this book is about the journey of a refugee from the latest civil war in the south (pre-Darfur, but with a lot of similarities).

It is an encyclopedia of suffering, but also an incredibly inspiring book, because of the attitude of the main character (a real person) and because of the brilliance of how the story is told. A real insight. Eggars has had some criticism for his approach, but none of it justified in my opinion. The book is amazing. To whoever gave it to me: thankyouthankyouthankyou!!!!

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Postby Jimmy Bastard » Tue Dec 04, 2007 2:11 pm

Yeah, I dropped it in your p-hole,
I saw a new Eggers book and immediately picked it up,
then knew it not realistic that I had the energy to take on 600 page book (small type too) about Darfur, heavy in too many ways.
but I knew a man who might.
So I'm chuffed to know you liked it.
All the books I'm currently reading are kind iof made up of collected essays and journalistic articles.
My recommend for this post would be
Perry Bible Fellowship - Nicholas Gurewitch.
Image
http://www.amazon.com/Perry-Bible-Fello ... 974&sr=8-1
http://pbfcomics.com/
He's a bit good.
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beev
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Postby beev » Tue Dec 04, 2007 3:32 pm

Smooth move Dai!

PBF is great.

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Shannon
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Postby Shannon » Tue Dec 04, 2007 3:36 pm

Do you have that Dai? I would very much really big wow like to take a look.

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Jimmy Bastard
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Postby Jimmy Bastard » Wed Apr 02, 2008 12:30 pm

AIRPORT '80
THE CONCORDE
A NOVEL BY KERRY STEWART
BASED ON A SCREENPLAY BY ERIC ROTH
FROM A STORY BY JENNINGS LANG
INSPIRED BY THE NOVEL AIRPORT BY ARTHUR HAILEY
NOW A FILM OF SKY-HIGH SUSPENSE FROM UNIVERSAL

IS THE FIRST AMERICAN CONCORDE DOOMED BY A ROBOT KILLER PLANE?
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Gandhi
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Postby Gandhi » Wed Apr 02, 2008 12:43 pm

That sounds ace!!!
It's like God's vagina!

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dan
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Postby dan » Thu Apr 03, 2008 11:21 am

'The Crying of Lot 49' - Thomas Pynchon
It's very very good and psyched out. you should read it too.
D xx
Our big brother's got no heart,
when I get my chance I'm going to punch him in the nose, in the nose, in the nose

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Postby beev » Thu Jun 26, 2008 8:17 pm

The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie

A marathon read, but worth it. A great portrait of Thatcherism and the 80s, among other things. Every page is poetry. Contains the following magnificent sentence:

'Once I'm an owl, what is the spell or antidote for turning me back into myself?' Mr Mohammed Sufyan, prop. Shandaar Cafe and landlord of the rooming-house above, mentor to the variegated, transient and particoloured inhabitants of both, seen-it-all type, least doctrinaire of hajis and most unashamed of VCR addicts, ex-schoolteacher, self-taught in classical texts of many cultures, dismissed from post in Dhaka owing to cultural differences with certain generals in the old days when Bangladesh was merely an East Wing, and therefore, in his own words, 'not so much an immig as an emig runt' - this last a good-natured allusion to his lack of inches, for though he was a wide man, thick of arm and waist, he stood no more than sixty-one inches off the ground, blinked in his bedroom doorway, awakened by Jumpy Joshi's urgent midnight knock, polished his half-rimmed spectacles on the edge of Bengali-style kurta (drawstrings tied at the neck in a neat bow), squeezed lids tightly shut open shut over myopic eyes, replaced glasses, opened eyes, stroked moustacheless hennaed beard, sucked teeth, and responded to the now-indisputable horns on the brow of the shivering fellow whom Jumpy, like the cat, appeared to have dragged in, with the above impromptu quip, stolen, with commendable mental alacrity for one aroused from his slumbers, from Lucius Apuleius of Madaura, Moroccan priest, AD 120-180 approx., colonial of an earlier Empire, a person who denied the accusation of having bewitched a rich widow yet confessed, somewhat perversely, that at an early stage in his career he had been transformed, by whichcraft, into (not an owl, but) an ass.


Also: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe

A very good, quick read. All about the Christanisation of African tribal dudes.

Both these books are available from me if anyone wants to have a read...

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Postby thehemulen » Thu Jun 26, 2008 9:57 pm

The Golden Hour Book
"If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, then eight. Then sixteen. Then thirty-two. Eventually one discovers that it is not boring at all." --John Cage.

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an important book

Postby amelia » Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:39 am

Mind Games. The guide to Inner Space. Classic mind training exercises for Imagination, Inspiration and Self Exploration. By Robert Masters & Jean Houston.

The Centre for Human Transformation, Victoria, Australia, depend largely on this work for their guided trances for healing. It is a book that depends on the knowing that you are only as limited as that which your consciousness determines is real.

John Lennon called this book "important and revolutionary" and I agree. I plan to use it for healing and it is something I would like to use at the forest in perhaps the crafty room or a larger room if need be.

I hope to return soon.

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Postby Gandhi » Fri Jul 04, 2008 8:43 am

Pegasus Bridge and D Day- both by Stephen E Ambrose.

This guy wrote Band of Brothers which is my fabourite mini series ever so thought I would give one of his books a go. They are absolutely brilliant. He has certainly researched as the historical accuracy is top notch and he doesn't fluff things up to tweak the emotions, he doesn't need to as the books are packed full of intimate stories from the soldiers who were actually there. This might not be a lot of people's cup of tea but I think it's fascinating and I highly, highly recommend you take a look...if, like me, you aren't a fast reader, the book D Day may take you a while as it's pretty big...
It's like God's vagina!

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Postby amelia » Sat Jul 05, 2008 7:48 am

Sacred geometry-deciphering the code.

Stephen Skinner, Gaia books 2006.

Very interesting. Makes sense why we became so mathematical, fixated on understanding with our minds, as it became possible for us to interpret, to the detriment of understanding things that we don't see, such as our feelings.

A`really lovely book, in layout, information and design.

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Postby milk » Wed Jul 09, 2008 3:17 am

just started The Metamorphosis of Prime Intellect again, fantastic self-published singularity sci-fi novella.

just finishing daniel guérin's 'anarchism'. he's not as objective in his writing style as i'd've liked, but it was good for the history (especially on varieties self-management in spain) none the less.

starting on the vampire the masquerade core rule book which i haven't looked at since school, just getting back into rpgs again (SLA next...)

also half-way through listening to the eyre affair for the queer mutiny book group (way for audiobooks/bittorrent). don't like the writing style though, too clichéd and no way near harry turtledove in terms of quality of alternative history.
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Postby martinmckenna » Fri Jul 11, 2008 9:39 pm

art and revolution ,
transversal activism in the long twentieth century
gerald raunig

a bit of text by same author

http://transform.eipcp.net/correspondence/1209407525

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Postby michaelbowdidge » Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:54 am

As usual I'm trying to read two things at once and not doing either of them any justice...

The Collected Works of Gertrude Stein - 1946 First Edition from the uni library - a gorgeous, gorgeous book in all senses of the word

AND

The Years of Rice and Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson - alternate history spanning several cnturies which starts from the premise that the Black Death wiped out the entire population of Europe rather than just a significant percentage. I like his other stuff, particularly the Red/Blue/Green Mars trilogy, and this looks promising so far...

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Postby Jimmy Bastard » Wed Jul 16, 2008 4:08 pm

Is Elvis Alive? Gail Brewer-Giorgio
Image
Pretty post-modern stuff with this one and also an outright cracker.
It begins with the author penning a fictional novel called Orion concerning a rock star hoaxing his own death.
The book sells poorly until it is realised that the plot has eerie parallels with that of Elvis' life, for instance the hero has a predilection for peanut butter,, banana and mayonnaise, this kind of knowledge was only available to those who operated in the King's inner sanctum or those who had the unlisted number to Elvis' private red telephone.
Back in reality-land and after Elvis' death a new recording artist appears on Sun Records roster, a masked crooner called Orion.
Odd rumours circulate
Orion playing two dates in different cities at the same time.
Then the book becomes explosive.
The author is exhaustive in her expose, there's a long drawn out section on numerology, which was an avid interest of Elvis, the evidence revealed is nothing if not damning.
Elvis needs the dates of his death date to add up to 2001 to tally with that of his mother's Gladys and a whole chapter is given over to the ingenious way he contrived for this to come to.
Here's an excerpt
The film 2001: SPACE ODYSSEY from which Elvis chose his theme song concerns the cosmic order of man through space and time. man's infinite and glorious immortality inside a spacecraft named Orion. If Elvis deliberately chose this date, then it's interesting to note that in the film it is "in the toilet" where the supreme character or hero executed his plans for immortality. Recall Elvis' body was found in the bathroom. 2001 is about illusion and the metaphysical. I find this more intriguing when one considers the emergence of a singer named Orion - two masked illusions?'

Now I need to track down the source inspiration, the book that Gail Brewer-Giorgio imagined and then, incredibly, seemed only too true...
ORION
Image
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Postby Jimmy Bastard » Wed Jul 16, 2008 5:08 pm

'Those who saw Elvis on the 15th and the 16th say his sideburns were down to his chin and grey was showing. Yet Larry Geller, Elvis' psychic, is quoted in the book ELVIS hairdresser that a short time prior to the body of Elvis being viewed he had to glue down a 'side-burn that had come loose'. If Elvis' sideburns were long, why would they have been shaved off then fake sideburns glued on? This gives credibility to the fact that most fans who viewed the body say it was not Elvis but was instead a wax dummy.'
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milk
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby milk » Thu Aug 07, 2008 3:32 am

almost finished Iain M. Banks' 'Matter' - not as good as his previous Culture novels IMO, although has it's moments. unfortunately the copy i'm reading is at the flat of friend i've been staying with in Muirhouse so i've started on another book that's been staring at me from the shelves of another friend i've been staying with - Cryptonomicon. swith, that's the one i mentioned to you last week. has been very enjoyable as of yet..
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby neil » Thu Aug 07, 2008 3:07 pm

milk wrote:almost finished Iain M. Banks' 'Matter'

i'm just finishing that too. i'd agree it's not as good as other culture ones, but still pretty good fun!

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby ravanwin » Mon Aug 25, 2008 12:07 pm

Wow.

I keep dipping into this beautiful book about the death of Olds' father. Amazingly, she is able to paint the death of a loved one with non-cliche images and ideas. Each page is an unexpected snapshot.

The poems are strikingly realistic and honest and have a universal quality to them. I love hold Olds manages to capture all the moments of dying --- of physical touching, memory and history --- into her poems. The book, of course, risks becoming a home-movie or a sugar-coated ode to a loved one. However, Olds is defiant and original in her voice and it makes for an incredible, gut-churning read.

As I was reading the book I kept drifting back to my Grandfather's body lying in hospital and waitting to die. I recalled his shrunken form and how the spit crusted to his dry lips. I remember looking at him, remember words spoken between short breath and I wondered how in the world anyone could write this? The days in the hospital just seemed so personal and tragic that a poem either felt like it wasn't big enough or felt massively too big, too weighty for what was essentially a simple thing, a natural and ultimate thing. If you have ever lost a loved one - this is a book to wrap yourself in again and again. The Father gave me some time with my own beloved and decesed. Like all great books, The Father is a little door that let's you go some place you don't normally go. I read this book and was grateful for the door.

It is a perfect compliment to Cornelius Eady's, "You Don't Miss Your Water" which also chronicles the death of a Father.

I recommend both books very highly.
Ryan

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby Jane » Mon Aug 25, 2008 2:32 pm

Ryan, that was a beautiful review x

I am all out of new books to read at the moment, if anyone wants to drop one for me in my pigeonhole to borrow I will return the favour, or give you something else nice.
"We all tend to idealise kindness and tolerance, then wonder why we find ourselves infested with losers and nutcases." Sebastian Horsley

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby ravanwin » Wed Sep 10, 2008 11:29 am

sam meekings: The Bestiary

This book of poems is not for everyone but I found it shockingly beautiful:

The book is broken up into two parts: Water and Air. I've read the Water section today and was so pleased with it I intend to re-read it tonight before bed. What strikes me the most is that Meekings is able to do that brilliant thing where he can describe the natural world in a way that sits in your stomach. It's not just a poem about A Frog or Oysters or Jellyfish - it is about death, love, age, childhood, memory, hope. Maybe this doesn't sound so impressive but I often find myself reading poems about trees which are just, you know, about trees. (I'm not particularly interested in trees.)

Anyway, it is a highly enjoyable collection and hope others will get a chance to pick it up.

Here's another good review:
http://polyolbion.blogspot.com/2008/08/ ... kings.html

I started reading the "Air" section of this book last night and it was so gutting I thought my intestines were going to fall out. As a writer - I always in in awe of poets who can pull off lines like:

"all the things we never said came hissing out / and made me old in a second."

and

"... the way to kill a thing is with words."

and

"We lined up in silence, as if it were an altar / at which were given countless lives, // where the tresses and tears of our eyelids, fingers, lips / were all stitched to the hem of the sky."

--- Me, I find I can't pull off that kind of linguistic beauty without seeming like I'm really really pushing it. The images are new and fresh and, yes, startling.

Obviously, I've been really enjoying dipping into this and in the second half "Air" I have found a lot more resonance. I found that the poem about hedgehogs almost made me cry.

Worth finding a copy. You can borrow my copy. It should be back at the SPL in a few days.
Ryan

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby neil » Fri Oct 24, 2008 6:13 pm

I thought Matter was pretty good in the end. Not as good as The Player of Games or Excession, but worth reading. I liked it's ruminations on the meaning of death, and altruism.

Read the Reluctant Fundamentalist a while ago. A lot of people would probably find it pretty annoying, but to me it was perfect.

Just finished The Jew of Malta by Marlowe. Basically a less sophisticated version of Merchant of Venice, and a comment on Machiavellianism as Marlowe perceived it at the time. Very funny.

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby Gandhi » Tue Jan 27, 2009 1:44 pm

BUMP! :D
I enjoyed Matter very much, first Ian M Banks booked I've ever read and I've got Player of Games and Remember Phlebus (or whatever its called) to read soon.

I'm currrently reading a book that has the potential to be life changing...yes I know thats a crazy thing to state but it is, for me at least.

It's called the China Study by T.Colin Campbell (PhD), who is one of the leading nutritionists and biologists in the world who has written a book stating why he went from being the son of a dairy farm owner eating crap loads of meat and dairy protein to being well, pretty much a vegan. It's not a diet booked but the story and findings of 30 years of researching (the New York Times called the China Study, the actual research program not the book itself, the "Grand Prix of Epidemiology") the effects of diet on the human body and especially the effects of animal protein on diseaes of affluence (e.g. heart disease, cancer etc). He's been shouted down (no matter how respected in his field and how conclusive his evidence is) by food organisations whom preofit from the sale of meat and dairy and added animal proteins in food. Its extremely interesting, very well written and bery thought provoking and a little scary.
I know a few of you are vegan already but I think you should take a look at this as well as many people make the decision based on a number of factors and from friends i normally talk to who are vegan they say its mainly down to animal welfare etc.

I'd lend it to people but there already seems to be a long list of people asking to borrow it.
It's like God's vagina!

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby milk » Wed Jan 28, 2009 11:38 pm

having read George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones/Clash of Kings since and reminded myself of fantasy settings, the juxtaposition of feudal vs. post-singularity 'worlds' in Matter makes more sense, making for an interesting distinction between the slower paced action with the technologically backed wham-bam-that's-how-fast-things-happen-with-AIs/computers ending.

i've been using the nifty LivingSocial Books service as of late if anyone might be interested in trying it.
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby chakan hislop » Wed Feb 18, 2009 10:21 am

Twelve Caesars, Suetonius
A great insight into the human condition and how intellect can manipulate and corrupt based on the 2 drivers of need, money/power and love/respect/sentiment it also gives a great insight into the issues surrounding the early development of the idea of democracy against dictatorship and vice versa from the perspective of the logistics of politics in ancient rome....

In Gods Name, David Yallop

Geat investigqtive journalism about the history of the vatican bank, its links to P2 the masonic lodge, the ideas and nature of pope Jean Paul the first, and the activities surrounding his papacy and death. This is a fascinqting book from 2 perspectives, 1. how the corrupting nature of wanting to rise within an organisation and what people are prepared to do to get leverage (this even occurs in the forest no one is immune), 2; for people who do not trul understqnd the catholic faith one would not go far wrong to look at the ideas of Jean Paul the Firsts writing, possibly Gods true pope who consistantly fought against the negative impact of the human condition on the catholic stucture and doctrine... Specifically abortion, the needs of developing countries the inclusion of the dispossed at the heart of the catholic doctrine and many other issues, he was incidentally not just a man of faith, he was a genius... If he had lived i believe certain issues would not have been able to develop the way they did for instance; the use of the abortion lobby in the US to galvanise the faithful to move further towards the right of politics, the lack of a non-inclusive strategy to deal with issues surrounding developing countries in the 80's and 90's, a notable amount of which are heavily catholic and other relevant issues which have not moved on as well as they could... Not only did this impact on the countires with a notable amount of catholics, but also sadly negativly impacted on the relevance of the catholic religion as a whole, causing many to look outside their own cultures and histories to find spirituality and/or faith.

How MumboJumbo conquered the World - Francis Wheen
A fantasticly funny book about how intelligent people have managed to create new markets by playing on the fear and nature of the human condition... One wonders about the discipline required to not do that given the opportunity, and whether one is able to catch themselves denying themselves of the very thing their passions dictate for the ephemeral greater good.. You might want to think about this Ryan (joke!!!)

Blowing up Russia, Alexander Litvinenko
Another masterpiece of investgive journalism that resulted in Litvienko's assasination. the book looks at the break down of law and order during glasnost, the infiltration of the russian mafia into the emerging free market, the manner in which the KGB and FSB managed the mafia, and implicity how this helped putin rise to a position of power... specifically highlighting his management of the chechnya crises, and how the idea of terror can effectivly be used to develop ones powerbase... no suprises there then....

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby Jimmy Bastard » Wed Feb 18, 2009 12:04 pm

Image
Talking With Serial Killers Christopher Berry Dee
I picked this one up as at the end of each interview, the author lists a correspondence address to the correctional facility the killer currently resides.
I have gifted the book to the Letter Writing Club for folk who need a new friend or two.
Also my idea is to befriend as many killers as I can with mind to build a vast art collection, I reckon if we are talking friend prices you can score a painting for about $30 or so.
It's a five year plan, Ill sell the joblot to Saatchi & Saatchi and I'll be a millionaire by the time I turn forty.
The book itself is great, Christopher Berry-Dee carries sufficient writing skills to duck any deathploitation accusations but has the nose of a gorehound and a ugly eye for detail
(this reminds me of my friend's dad's verdict of Saving Private Ryan was - "ace - action all the way")
Above all, it's the normality I dig on.
The usual tale runs, convicted for butchering babies, serve two to three years, paroled and freed through a bureaucratic loophole, get back on the campaign trail, bodycount mounts, then without fail, they get married and trip up on some domestic anomaly.
Wifey makes the call.
I actually read this in tandem with a critical study on Iain Sinclair
Image
what became apparent is that psychogeography is an anti-social occupation, serial killers are anti-tour guides of the truly hidden, it comes with the territory.
When I was home across Christmas, a friend had to travel out of town to see an Uncle to pass on presents as he had a restraining order out on him, this too can be viewed upon in a similar vain, for what is the restraining order but a form of modern-day derive.
Next on the list
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby Gandhi » Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:19 pm

The eyes on the Talking with Cerial Killas book look like George Bush!
It's like God's vagina!

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby Roman » Thu Feb 19, 2009 10:59 am

Young Stalin by Simon Sebag Montefiore

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/ju ... y.politics

69 Things To Do With A Dead Princess
by Stewart Home (in the process)

http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?isbn=1841953814
"Don't trust anyone over thirty" - Jerry Rubin

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby ravanwin » Sun Apr 19, 2009 3:41 am

Jimmy Bastard wrote:Image
Talking With Serial Killers Christopher Berry Dee
I picked this one up as at the end of each interview, the author lists a correspondence address to the correctional facility the killer currently resides.
I have gifted the book to the Letter Writing Club for folk who need a new friend or two.
Also my idea is to befriend as many killers as I can with mind to build a vast art collection, I reckon if we are talking friend prices you can score a painting for about $30 or so.
It's a five year plan, Ill sell the joblot to Saatchi & Saatchi and I'll be a millionaire by the time I turn forty.


Just a follow up? How is the collection going, Dai?
R

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby amelia » Sun Apr 19, 2009 9:36 am

Looks interesting. Helpful to this thread is Profle Of A Criminal Mind, Brian Innes, Amber Books 2003. I have this on the shelves here, makes a lot of sense. I need these for my book project, also Criminal Profile, into the mind of the killer, Wayne Petherick, Hardie Grant Books 2005.

So basic the life similarities of these people and my own family members and experiences to assist my insight. How to create a human that may seek the creativity of harming and hurting and killing, is ridiculously simple. Easier than to avoid, in some situations common these days. Neglection and not bothering to learn how to take care of someone, doesn't take a lot of time and effort! Of course there is no hope of awareness that there is actually another point to life completely in these situations...some find it in jail though, when left isolated, restricted, and unstimulated fo long periods. When the only place to go is behind your eyes. A bit like parts of my childhood...

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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby amelia » Sun Apr 19, 2009 6:01 pm

Healing Circumcism, Deva Daricha. Greenwood Press, Aust 2003.

Lotus Birth, Shivam Rachana. Greenwood Press, Aust 2000

These two are the amazing couple behind the Centre for Human Transformation in Victoria, who last I heard, had been right in the bushfire vicinity and lost much. I wonder how there are.

Cutting Edge information in these books. Deva was circumcised and he goes into it to every level and lots of experiences of others in his presentation to a Global Inspiration Conference. A cd of the talk is recommended to listen to with it. I heard him speak of it separately. He has a healing CD available as well. I feel to not say a lot as I consider it 'men's business' and I wish to be respectful, but, it is also the mothers/females, who let this happen for one reason or another, so as a woman I can ask that they please stop. It is mutilation that is unnecessary, just as the genital mutilation, carried out to countless women around the world. Violence at birth and non reconition of our worth at birth. This has a huge impact on us.

Rachana's book isthe only one in assistance I believe that goes into the benefits - now with lots of supportive cases, of leaving the placenta attached to the baby after birth a while. I had no idea that it contained approx a third of the blood supply and was considered an 'organ' to say the least of this book. Seems appropriate - aside from the significance to ourselves as an energy asnd spiritual being - to leave it til much of the blood has been reabsorbed by the little body. This book goes into many other reasons.
Violence at birth & non recognition of our worth at birth again. I have met babies from a lotus birth and I can see visible differences.

great stuff

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stephengoodall
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby stephengoodall » Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:21 pm

coincidentally and also in a psychogeographical vein, i have recently finished JG Ballard's Concrete Island and have now moved on to Crash. Been meaning to read these for a long time after being put on to them by Jean Baudrillard's essay Simulacra and Science Fiction and his citation of them as a new type of science fiction:

"Crash is our world, nothing is really "invented" therein, everything is hyper-functional: traffic and accidents, technology and death, sex and the camera eye. Everything is like a huge simulated and synchronous machine; an acceleration of our own models, of all the models which surround us, all mixed together and hyper-operationalized in the void."

Whereas Crash's narrative operates on a skewed timeline, arranged according to the psychic meanderings of the protagonist, Concrete Island operates on a more linear narrative. The premise of concrete island I find more interesting than the progression of the story from A to B, the writing seeming to carry out the inevitable journey one expects. Crash is an uneasy read, definitively capturing the commonplace idea that in watching a car crash, one is transfixed and unable to look away despite the certainty of the oncoming horror.

I really admire Ballard's descriptions of the urban landscapes and the neglected narratives therein, he has a great knack for simultaneously housing his landscapes in the mundane and the fantastical. Good stuff.
First there is a mountain, then there is no mountain, then there is.

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Jane
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby Jane » Mon Apr 20, 2009 8:26 pm

JG r-i-p
he is amazing
x
"We all tend to idealise kindness and tolerance, then wonder why we find ourselves infested with losers and nutcases." Sebastian Horsley

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thehemulen
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby thehemulen » Sat May 23, 2009 12:34 pm

Succubus / Ericka Duffy (forest pub.)

b4 that it was Bill Drummonds "17"

2 books in one year? thats enough reading for me i think!
"If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, then eight. Then sixteen. Then thirty-two. Eventually one discovers that it is not boring at all." --John Cage.

gareth the second
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby gareth the second » Sat May 23, 2009 8:52 pm

Paul Virilio : Art and Fear. Virilio is to me one of few living philosophers that has relevance in our lives today. The Aesthetics of Disappearence......!

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thehemulen
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Re: What was the last book you read?

Postby thehemulen » Sun Jun 13, 2010 10:40 am

Finite & Infinite Games.
best book ever!

Modulations: history of electronic music.
highly informative

Watchmen.
mighty graphic novel.

nu yearz resolution was only to read boox withan index.
"If something is boring after two minutes, try it for four. If still boring, then eight. Then sixteen. Then thirty-two. Eventually one discovers that it is not boring at all." --John Cage.


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